Thursday, July 3, 2008

Video posts..

Everyone who suggested some topics- thank you. I think we'll start there and then add our own useless crap just for fun (my newest core exercise is hitting golf balls with a baseball bat- seriously good core work!) . If anyone has anything that they would like to see, let me know and I'll try to do it. Jeff will be the model.. thongs and baby oil is all I got to say.

9 comments:

Matt said...

can't wait for the video posts, especially the golf/baseball bat sequence. Nice.

I got the picture on the run drill. Thanks, and during my run today I kinda visualized and remember seeing track teams doing such a stride.

Stupid question and feel free to just let me sink on it: I run 10 miles, first 5 MAF, second 5 really hard, wanting to go 2-8 beats below LT but I guess because of the heat, the dehydration (not too bad) and my lack of discipline I spend a few miles 5-6 beats above LT . I wasn't dying, just running hard. Felt good. Avg. HR 150 for the 10 miles. Max 175. I wasn't all out and it was hot. I liked it. Am I fooling myself?

Lucho said...

Matt- That is the perfect example of the HR monitor's fallibility. And I think this is where HR poo-pooers say it's not a good tool. Your PE was below LT but HR was above because of stress- not on your leg muscles- but on your heart, so you chose to ignore a warning sign from your heart.
I argue that this isn't the HR monitor's fallibility but it is it's greatest benefit. Your HEART was telling you something! Why would you want to ignore something so important? Ok- you wanted the benefit of a tempo run- which you should be incorporating at this point- but something was wrong with your HR and that should be a cause for concern. I'm sure there was no harm in that run.. but you should be asking yourself the why and how of the situation so you can learn and then correct the situation. For an athlete to intentionally ignore how their HEART is reacting to stress is inane.. it's the most important organ in the body and is directly affected by training! One of favorite analogies is the NASCAR (I love NASCAR) vs. runner comparison. First off- a car is a very simple machine where the human body is so complex that modern medicine still hasn't figured it all out yet! But a NASCAR team only puts in the absolute highest grade of 110-octane leaded gas. Yet I see people going the drive through at McDonalds putting shit (literally) in to their bodies. That's another rant for another post though.
NASCAR drivers use their tachometer only.. no speedometer because a speedometer is irrelevant. The only thing that is important is how hard the engine (HEART) of the car is working. I would doubt very much that Jeff Gordon (I used to make some of his engine parts- seriously) has ever been driving along and thought- "Well, my tach is over redline.. but oh well, I feel good!". Maybe that's a stupid analogy- but you get the point.
My athletes know that if they were to relate your story to me they would be told to not do that again..

Anonymous said...

I love the idea of video posts! You guys are definately my go to as far as blogs are concerned. To be honest, I've learned more from you guys in the past few months of reading your blogs than I had in about a year of reading mags and books! I think the videos will be the icing on the cake! Backtracking-I'm glad to see your guys comments on the Newtons...I switched to them about 2 months ago. After putting a few hundred miles on a couple pairs, I've suddenly started having weird injuries to things (like the calf) that I've never injured. I think they're a great training tool as my stride has definately improved, but after seeing what you and everyone else has said, I'm going to switch back to my regular trainers for a bit and see how my body does. Again Lucho, thanks for the great info and I look forward to the vids!!!

Matt said...

So although the average work I put on my heart was Aet, going above LT like that AT ALL is a big no no? Hmmm. MAF is two-fold: Avg. and Max, both equally important. Avg. HR seems to get the most attention, discussion.

In your approach, are there tempo runs that go above LT? Or is that saved for racing?

My tempos need to be 2-8 beats below LT, steady, as little deviation as possible. Right?

Thanks for the feedback. I'm less pleased than I was!

Dave said...

Hooray videos! Great idea and I can't wait to see them! You and Chuckie V. have been such a great source of info, this is like the icing on the cake!

Backtracking...I feel the same way about the Newtons. I've put a few hundred miles on a pair and loved them at first. However, recently I keep getting nagging little injuries using them. Never had a calf strain in my life, but for the first time last week got one. Never had a foot issue, and now I have one. I assumed since I didn't have any issues during the "break in" period, I'd be ok, but the last couple of weeks have left me a little beat up suddenly. I think they're a great training "tool" as my stride has definately improved since using them, but as for everyday trainers I think I'll go back to my Asics for a while and see if I feel any better.

Thanks again Lucho, great posts as always...

Lucho said...

Matt- I think that max HR is more, or at least equal, to importance than average HR. If your max MAF HR is 150.. and you average 150.. then you HAD to be over 150 at some point. The reason there are maximum HR's is to indicate the need to not go beyond that number. You should try to think of your training in terms metabolism and what effect training has on it. HR is a guide to allow you to exploit your training more effectively- it will help you to quantify your metabolism. Once you go anaerobic (there are different definitions of anaerobic but I am referring to "above LT") then your body virtually stops burning fat as fuel. True Tempo training (2-8 beats below LT) is adequate for you to stimulate your lactate threshold and holds far fewer risks. Consider too the race you are targeting. Anything beyond 2 hours and there isn't going to be much pay off to running above LT. A better workout- and Chuck and I just had a long discussion on this- would be for you to run 1:30 at MAF- essentially fatiguing your slow twitch fibers and depleting your blood lipids... THEN do hill repeats or a tempo run. The benefits of the timing of the increased workload are enhanced. Fast twitch fibers are brought in to the equation and will play a much more key role in the run.
By definition a tempo run does not go beyond LT. If you reference Jack Daniels the order of intensity is Tempo: just below LT. Intervals: just above (or ~10k pace) and Repetitions: roughly 3k-5k race effort(HR could be considered irrelevant). The Repetitions have a focus on improved economy and Vo2 max and are placed roughly 16-18 weeks from the A-race. Canova follows a similar approach but differs from Daniels in that the final period (6-8 weeks preceding the A-race)has very little intensity.. nothing beyond 103% of goal marathon pace. Think metabolism!
You should be incredibly pleased with that workout- just look at what you're learning! There's nothing more valuable than learning from an experience... it's who we are.

Lucho said...

Angela- I'm sick of seeing Jeff in thong...

Matt said...

Word. I love the 1:30 MAF and then tempo/hills idea. I've tried something like that and actually thought yesterday's run was similar in concept (5 MAF, 5 Tempo), but I blew up. I'll incorporate those types of runs. I'll do one this weekend!

I just have to watch my Max.
I'm learning that's the key.

Wish I could buy you a beer, Tim.

Have a great weekend.

JK1 said...

listen- I don't like to brag, but I look damn good in a thong, so you watch it you two...